Tag Archives: statistics

3 reasons why Info / Ref Desk stats are important

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  1. Tells you whether your Information/Reference Services desk are utilized or NOT.  Well , if no one comes to the InfoDesk to ask questions it could mean a few things: either it is positioned in a non-strategic place in the library or it’s redundant as your users could be asking questions via email/live chat/social media.   Perhaps its time to start the roving library staff services.
  2. Informs you what kind of question(s) your users are asking.  If you are getting a lot of directional questions, perhaps its time to start a user experience study on the library signages.  Check out this interesting article:  Signage by Design: A Design-Thinking Approach to Library User Experience
  3. Indicator showing the peak period when users ‘visit’ the Info/Ref Desk to ask questions.  For example, our library uses Ref Analytics (part of LibAnswers product by Springshare) to record all the questions we get at the InfoDesk.  From the RefAnalytics stats feature, we can tabulate data according to the peak periods by month, day, and time.  This information helps our Reference Coordinator to plan the InfoDesk schedules accordingly.

Out of curiosity, have any libraries do away with their Info/Ref Desks and replaced them with other innovative methods?

Stats here, Stats there, Stats everywhere

World setting statistics I decided to take a break from ERM for a few hours today.  Something caught my eye: our Google Analytics statistics for the library’s website, our Summon (discovery service) usage reports, 360 statistics (AZ management system: EBooks and EJournals, Databases) and LibGuides / LibAnswers.

Some background:
Google Analytics gives us insight on how users are interacting with our website. We can get information such as:

  • number of page views
  • number of unique page views
  • average time spent on a page/screen / or set of screens
  • bounce rate:  each time a person leave your site without interacting with it
  • new and returning visitors
  • Browser and Operating system used
  • Mobile statistics such as desktop, mobile and tablet used
  • Users demographics: age and gender
  • and many more

Summon (Discovery layer)  stats provide:

  • Visitor Profiles:
    • Referring Source
    • Geo Location
    • Geo Map Overlay
    • Network Location
    • Domains
  • Technical Profiles
    • Browser
    • Platform
    • Browser and Platform combos
    • Connection Speed
  • Top Queries

Taken from Summon Knowledge Center

360 Usage Statistics provide:

  • Click-Through: A variety of views into the number of times users click on article, journal, ebook, and database links in ProQuest discovery tools.
  • Search and Browse: Shows what types of searches your users are conducting (for example, Title Contains and ISSN Equals) and what subjects they are browsing within ProQuest discovery tools.
  • 360 Link Usage: Reports about where your 360 Link users are starting their research, and how much use 360 Link is getting.
  • 360 Search Usage: Shows the amount of 360 Search federated search sessions and searches.

(Taken from 360 Core and Intota knowledge center)

LibGuides provide statistics on

  • libguide homepage tracking (daily and monthly basis)
  • detailed statistics for all libguides
  • session tracking
  • browser / OS tracking
  • search term tracking
  • assets
  • content summary

(Taken from LibGuide Dashboard)

LibAnswers also provide statistics on

  • general statistics on inquiries
  • FAQs
  • turnaround time

among others.  (Taken from LibAnswers Dashboard).

From all those stats, I started to wonder:

  • What does the term/keyword entered by users into the various access points mean?
  • If a certain keyword/term appears constantly, is it pointing to a lack of information? or lack of awareness of an existing service?
  • Can we improve our library homepage usability when the bounce rates are high?

There are more than just the ones listed above.

How can all these stats influence the way we provide services to our library users – whether it’s an online service or a physical service.  After all, we are here to serve our users.